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SUGAR
SUICIDE

Sugar is literally killing us.

Dr. Avena provides the research behind the epidemic and brings awareness on 10 diseases and ailments that are of top concern.

Sugar has consumed the modern diet

Sugar is everywhere. We expect it some places, like our desserts and breakfast cereals, but we’re shocked to see it sneaking into unexpected foods—many that aren’t even sweet—like in our sandwich bread, taco seasoning, and bacon. Even though the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends no more than 6-9 teaspoons of sugar per day1, the average American consumes more than 16 teaspoons per day2. “Many people consume more sugar than they realize. It’s important to be aware of how much sugar you consume because our bodies don’t need sugar to function properly. Added sugars contribute zero nutrients but many added calories that can lead to extra pounds or even obesity, thereby reducing heart health.” 1

 

Part of the reason why people are overconsuming sugar is because it is not always easy to know whether or not a product contains it. Sugar is a sweetener that has many names, but most commonly in the foods we eat sugar comes in the form of sucrose (table sugar) or high-fructose corn syrup. The list of sugar pseudonyms is currently 61 different names, making it difficult to decipher food labels.

 

Let’s be clear though: it’s the added sugar that processed foods are hiding that is the issue, not the natural sugars in nutrient-dense fruits. The addition of added sugar to so many packaged goods actually led the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) to have the nutritional label requirements updated to specifically call out ‘added sugars’ in order to help educate consumers on what’s hiding inside the box.

Why exactly is sugar so bad for you?

We often hear about the dangers of eating too much sugar. But why, exactly, is it bad for us? Sugar is calorie-dense but void of any nutrients. Years of research are pointing more and more to the role of sugar in diseases, cancers, and neurological issues.

 

Because of the immediate, widespread, and extensive effects that sugar has on the body, it’s nearly considered a drug. Sadly, the awareness of the evils of sugar is still very low, meaning many people are consuming way too much with no idea of the short-term and long-term risks. While the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) began requiring ‘Added Sugars’ to be identified on all nutrition labels in 2017, overall awareness still remains low and a true understanding of recommended daily sugar intake is not a widespread concern.

 

Of those who are aware how toxic sugar is to the body, many are completely removing sugar from their diets. That may seem like a horrible existence, but reducing your risk for, or managing pre-existing, diseases is ever-important in this highly-processed, genetically-modified world.

 

In the case of sugar, the risks are high and the links clear: sugar causes disease. Let’s take a look at ten ailments that have been linked to too much sugar consumption, and see just how damaging sugar can be to our health.

Table of contents

  1. Obesity
  2. Metabolic Syndrome (a constellation of conditions that increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in postmenopausal women)
  3. Hypertension
  4. Fatty Liver Disease
  5. Diabetes
  6. Heart Disease
  7. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
  8. Cancer
  9. Inattention (Cognitive Functioning)
  10. Death

Obesity

The second leading cause of preventable death in the United States (smoking is first)3, obesity poses significant health risks, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancers. “Increasingly, many of these diseases, previously associated only with adulthood, are also being seen in overweight and obese children.”3  Presently, almost 40% of the population is obese4. Studies show that consumption of sugar-containing foods and beverages is linked to the development of obesity5, and cutting out sugar from one’s diet can reduce body weight6. “Experimental evidence, epidemiological studies, and clinical studies have provided convincing evidence that sugary beverages increase the risk not only for obesity but also for features of metabolic syndrome, including elevated blood pressure, insulin resistance, fatty liver, and dyslipidemia.”5

 

“The evidence that decreasing sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs) will decrease the risk of obesity and related diseases such as T2D is compelling”6.

(Map: reference 4, CDC)

Metabolic Syndrome

This syndrome, which affects over 3 million people in the US alone, refers to a cluster of biochemical and physiological abnormalities associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The main causes are stress and being overweight, and studies show that increased intake of sugar contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome7. For example, “sugar-sweetened beverage and ASB [artificially sweetened beverage] intake are both associated with metabolic syndrome”7. The good news is that studies show that reducing sugar from one’s diet can reverse the effects and progression of metabolic syndrome8. “Quitting smoking and reducing intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and meat and meat products are mandatory”8.

Definition:

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions that occur together, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes.

Having 3 of these metabolic risk factors can result in a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome.

  • A large waistline
  • A high triglyceride level
  • A low HDL cholesterol level
  • High blood pressure
  • High fasting blood sugar

Hypertension

Also, known as high blood pressure, is a condition in which one’s blood pressure is over 140/90 (normal is 120/80). This condition affects approximately 3 million individuals per year, and is directly associated with diet. Studies have shown that diets high in sugar and other processed foods can increase risk of hypertension. In particular, a recent meta-analysis revealed that higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was associated with a higher risk of hypertension and coronary heart disease. Reducing intake of sugar-sweetened beverages is suggested in order to improve blood pressure readings and reduce hypertension (9). “Actions to reduce salt and sugar intake across the whole population will have major beneficial effects on health along with major cost savings” (9).


non alcoholic fatty liver disease

Chronic liver disease (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common type seen) is a chronic condition that develops over time as a result of the liver storing too much fat in its cells. Over time, this can lead to liver cirrhosis and death if not properly treated. Many studies suggest that diet can have an impact on the development of this condition. Sugar seems to play a key role in the development of fatty-liver; studies suggest that fructose-containing sugars are a major source of excess calories, and that a reduction of their intake has potential for the prevention of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and other obesity-related diseases10. “Both caloric restriction and physical activity effectively reduce hepatic steatosis, but most patients are unable to stick with such lifestyles in the long term.

Targeting fructose-associated hepatic DNL may offer an alternative strategy to the management of NAFLD”10. “A reduction in fructose intake can be achieved by several means, including low-carbohydrate diets, low-sugar diets, and/or the substitution of dietary fructose with low-fructose sweeteners”10.

DIABETES

Type-2 diabetes is a condition in which the body can no longer appropriately respond to, and in some cases produce, the hormone insulin. If not properly treated, diabetes can lead to serious health complications, including neuropathy, blindness and even death. More than 29 million people in the US have diabetes11, with trends showing that more and more people are being diagnosed each year.

“Another 86 million adults – more than one in three U.S. adults – have prediabetes, where their blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Without weight loss and moderate physical activity, 15 percent to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years”11. Diet, and sugar intake, in particular, is directly related to the development and progression of diabetes12. It is advised that those with diabetes carefully monitor their diet and eat sugar in moderation. “Sugar meets all the public health criteria for regulation”12.

heart disease

Heart disease places people at risk for heart attack or stroke. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women, and also a leading cause of death among men.13 Risk factors include being obese, smoking, and having a family history of heart disease. “Heart disease is largely preventable” and “Healthy eating and physical activity go a long way to prevent heart disease, and keeping it from getting worse if you already have it”13. Some heart disease is genetic, but lifestyle plays a significant role, as well.13 Diet has an impact on the development of heart disease. One recent scientific paper suggested that sugar is more related to the development of heart disease than saturated fat14, so reducing intake of sugars is key, especially if you are at risk for developing heart disease. “Dietary guidelines should shift focus away from reducing saturated fat, and from replacing saturated fat with carbohydrates, specifically when these carbohydrates are refined".14

polycystic ovary syndrome

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is a condition in which the body produces many cysts on the ovaries. Also known as PCOS, this condition affects between 5-10% of women aged 15-44. The symptoms can vary, but can include cystic acne, excessive hair growth (facial hair), and irregular menstruation. Infertility is also a common symptom. Sugar seems to have a direct impact this condition. A diet low in carbohydrates and sugars can alleviate many of the symptoms of PCOS.15 “A diet low in carbohydrates (LCD) may be superior to a standard diet in terms of improving fertility, endocrine/metabolic parameters, weight loss and satiety in women with PCOS”.15


cancer

There has been a lot of new research investigating links between sugar and cancer. Studies show that sugar may promote the development and growth of cancer cells, in addition to healthy cells. But the biggest link between cancer and sugar actually is indirect, via the fact that sugar can promote obesity, and obesity is directly linking to increasing risk for developing cancer.16

Endometrial, liver, kidney, gastric, colorectal and pancreatic cancers are just a few of the many that have been shown to greater in individuals who have a high body mass index. “Many observational studies have provided consistent evidence that people who have lower weight gain during adulthood have lower risks of colon cancer, kidney cancer, and—for postmenopausal women—breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers”.16


Innatention (cognitive functioning)

Brain health is something on the minds (literally!) of many individuals. New studies suggest that what we eat can have a direct impact on our brain health, especially our cognitive functioning and attention. Several studies have shown that a diet high in refined carbohydrates can have a negative impact on neurocognitive functioning17. “Early life exposure to refined carbohydrates, (i.e., prenatal, juvenile, and adolescence periods) may be particularly toxic to cognitive functioning”17. Potential mechanisms of the carbohydrate-cognition relationship include dysregulation in metabolic, inflammatory, and vascular factors. Interestingly, the negative neurocognitive impacts of diets high in refined carbohydrates have been shown to be independent of total body weight, meaning that if you are overeating sugars and are normal weight, they can still impact your cognitive functioning. This is all the more reason to skip the added sugars!

death

fact: sugar can kill you

While it isn’t exactly an ailment, death is certainly something we want to avoid. But has sugar really been linked to it? You bet. A recent clinical study showed that consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was positively related to increased mortality18. The researchers “documented 36,436 deaths (7,896 cardiovascular disease [CVD] and 12,380 cancer deaths)... After adjusting for major diet and lifestyle factors, consumption of SSBs was associated with a higher risk of total mortality."18

life without sugar can still be perfectly sweet

It might not be fast, and you likely won’t notice your slow death from high sugar consumption, especially not as you eat your favorite sugar-laden foods…but the toll of sugar on your body is a truth bomb.

As explained, sugar intake plays a role in the development and exacerbation of many different health conditions, and yes, even death. Reducing added sugar intake should be a priority for everyone. It can not only improve how you feel and look, but it can also help you stay healthy and reduce your risk of developing many different health-related disorders.

At Lakanto, we value the sweet life: the long, healthy journey to your best self and giving you time to leave your mark on this world. In life, we all want sweetness, but that doesn’t have to be in the form of sugar. In fact, thousands of years ago, a healthy sweetener was found by the Luo Han monks in the mystic, pristine mountains of Asia. Enter monk fruit.

Lakanto’s mission is to bring chi to life and inspire people to reach their highest potential in health and wellness. We create products with monk fruit that are innovative, delicious, natural, nutritious, sugar-free, and healthy. See if our monk fruit sweeteners and convenience mixes make your choice to live a sugar-free life a bit more satisfying.

 

Find Your Chi
Live Sugar Free

Lakanto.com


References

  1. American Heart Association (2018). Added Sugars. Retrieved from https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/sugar/added-sugars.
  2. National Cancer Institute (2018). Usual Daily Intake of Added Sugars. Retrieved from   https://epi.grants.cancer.gov/diet/usualintakes/pop/2007-10/table_a40.html.
  3. New York State Department of Health (2018). Obesity Prevention. Retrieved from https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/obesity/.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Adult Obesity Facts. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html.
  5. Johnson RJ, Sánchez-Lozada LG, Andrews P, Lanaspa MA (2017). Perspective: A historical and scientific perspective of sugar and its relation with obesity and diabetes. Adv Nutr. 8(3):412-422. doi: 10.3945/an.116.014654. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28507007.
  6. Hu FB (2013). Resolved: there is sufficient scientific evidence that decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases. Obes Rev. 14(8):606-19. doi: 10.1111/obr.12040. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23763695.
  7. Narain A, Kwok CS, Mamas MA (2017). Soft drink intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Clin Pract. 71(2). doi: 10.1111/ijcp.12927. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28074617.
  8. Pérez-Martínez P, Mikhailidis DP, Athyros VG, Bullo M, Couture P, Covas MI, et al. (2017). Lifestyle recommendations for the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome: an international panel recommendation. Nutr Rev.75(5):307-326. doi: 10.1093/nutrit/nux014. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28521334.
  9. He FJ, MacGregor GA (2015). Salt and sugar: their effects on blood pressure. Pflugers Arch. 467(3):577-86. doi: 10.1007/s00424-014-1677-x. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25547872.
  10. Ter Horst KW, Serlie MJ (2017). Fructose consumption, lipogenesis, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Nutrients. 9(9). pii: E981. doi: 10.3390/nu9090981. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28878197.
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). More than 29 million Americans has diabetes; 1 in 4 doesn’t know. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0610-diabetes-report.html.
  12. Lustig RH (2016). Sickeningly Sweet: Does sugar cause Type 2 Diabetes? Yes. Can J Diabetes. 40(4):282-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2016.01.004. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27216628.
  13. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (2019). The heart truth. Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/education-and-awareness/heart-truth.
  14. DiNicolantonio JJ, Lucan SC, O'Keefe JH (2016). The evidence for saturated fat and for sugar related to coronary heart disease. Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 58(5):464-72. doi: 10.1016/j.pcad.2015.11.006. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26586275.
  15. Frary JM, Bjerre KP, Glintborg D, Ravn P (2016). The effect of dietary carbohydrates in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review. Minerva Endocrinol. 41(1):57-69. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24914605.
  16. National Cancer Institute (2017). Obesity and Cancer. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/obesity/obesity-fact-sheet.
  17. Hawkins MAW, Keirns NG, Helms Z (2018). Carbohydrates and cognitive function. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 21(4):302-307. doi: 10.1097/MCO.0000000000000471. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29851417.

18. Malik VS, Li Y, Pan A, De Koning L, Schernhammer E, Willett WC, Hu FB (2019). Long-term consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages and risk of mortality in US adults. Circulation. 139(18):2113-2125. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.037401. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30882235.

SUGAR SUICIDE

Sugar is literally killing us.

Dr. Avena provides the research behind the epidemic and brings awareness on 10 diseases & ailments that are a top concern.

Sugar has consumed the modern diet

Sugar is everywhere. We expect it some places, like our desserts and breakfast cereals, but we’re shocked to see it sneaking into unexpected foods—many that aren’t even sweet—like in our sandwich bread, taco seasoning, and bacon. Even though the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends no more than 6-9 teaspoons of sugar per day1, the average American consumes more than 16 teaspoons per day2. “Many people consume more sugar than they realize. It’s important to be aware of how much sugar you consume because our bodies don’t need sugar to function properly. Added sugars contribute zero nutrients but many added calories that can lead to extra pounds or even obesity, thereby reducing heart health.” 1

 

Part of the reason why people are overconsuming sugar is because it is not always easy to know whether or not a product contains it. Sugar is a sweetener that has many names, but most commonly in the foods we eat sugar comes in the form of sucrose (table sugar) or high-fructose corn syrup. The list of sugar pseudonyms is currently 61 different names, making it difficult to decipher food labels.

 

Let’s be clear though: it’s the added sugar that processed foods are hiding that is the issue, not the natural sugars in nutrient-dense fruits. The addition of added sugar to so many packaged goods actually led the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) to have the nutritional label requirements updated to specifically call out ‘added sugars’ in order to help educate consumers on what’s hiding inside the box.

Why exactly is sugar so bad for you?

We often hear about the dangers of eating too much sugar. But why, exactly, is it bad for us? Sugar is calorie-dense but void of any nutrients. Years of research are pointing more and more to the role of sugar in diseases, cancers, and neurological issues.

 

Because of the immediate, widespread, and extensive effects that sugar has on the body, it’s nearly considered a drug. Sadly, the awareness of the evils of sugar is still very low, meaning many people are consuming way too much with no idea of the short-term and long-term risks. While the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) began requiring ‘Added Sugars’ to be identified on all nutrition labels in 2017, overall awareness still remains low and a true understanding of recommended daily sugar intake is not a widespread concern.

 

Of those who are aware how toxic sugar is to the body, many are completely removing sugar from their diets. That may seem like a horrible existence, but reducing your risk for, or managing pre-existing, diseases is ever-important in this highly-processed, genetically-modified world.

 

In the case of sugar, the risks are high and the links clear: sugar causes disease. Let’s take a look at ten ailments that have been linked to too much sugar consumption, and see just how damaging sugar can be to our health.

Table of contents


Obesity

The second leading cause of preventable death in the United States (smoking is first)3, obesity poses significant health risks, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancers. “Increasingly, many of these diseases, previously associated only with adulthood, are also being seen in overweight and obese children.”3  Presently, almost 40% of the population is obese4. Studies show that consumption of sugar-containing foods and beverages is linked to the development of obesity5, and cutting out sugar from one’s diet can reduce body weight6. “Experimental evidence, epidemiological studies, and clinical studies have provided convincing evidence that sugary beverages increase the risk not only for obesity but also for features of metabolic syndrome, including elevated blood pressure, insulin resistance, fatty liver, and dyslipidemia.”5

 

“The evidence that decreasing sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs) will decrease the risk of obesity and related diseases such as T2D is compelling”6.

(Map: reference 4, CDC)

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome, which affects over 3 million people in the US alone, refers to a cluster of biochemical and physiological abnormalities associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The main causes are stress and being overweight, and studies show that increased intake of sugar contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome7. For example, “sugar-sweetened beverage and ASB [artificially sweetened beverage] intake are both associated with metabolic syndrome”7. The good news is that studies show that reducing sugar from one’s diet can reverse the effects and progression of metabolic syndrome8. “Quitting smoking and reducing intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and meat and meat products are mandatory”8.

Definition:

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions that occur together, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes.

Having 3 of these metabolic risk factors can result in a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome:

  • A large waistline
  • A high triglyceride level
  • A low HDL cholesterol level
  • High blood pressure
  • High fasting blood sugar

Hypertension

Also, known as high blood pressure, is a condition in which one’s blood pressure is over 140/90 (normal is 120/80). This condition affects approximately 3 million individuals per year, and is directly associated with diet. Studies have shown that diets high in sugar and other processed foods can increase risk of hypertension. In particular, a recent meta-analysis revealed that higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was associated with a higher risk of hypertension and coronary heart disease. Reducing intake of sugar-sweetened beverages is suggested in order to improve blood pressure readings and reduce hypertension (9). “Actions to reduce salt and sugar intake across the whole population will have major beneficial effects on health along with major cost savings” (9).


non alcoholic fatty liver disease

Chronic liver disease (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common type seen) is a chronic condition that develops over time as a result of the liver storing too much fat in its cells. Over time, this can lead to liver cirrhosis and death if not properly treated. Many studies suggest that diet can have an impact on the development of this condition. Sugar seems to play a key role in the development of fatty-liver; studies suggest that fructose-containing sugars are a major source of excess calories, and that a reduction of their intake has potential for the prevention of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and other obesity-related diseases10. “Both caloric restriction and physical activity effectively reduce hepatic steatosis, but most patients are unable to stick with such lifestyles in the long term.

Targeting fructose-associated hepatic DNL may offer an alternative strategy to the management of NAFLD”10. “A reduction in fructose intake can be achieved by several means, including low-carbohydrate diets, low-sugar diets, and/or the substitution of dietary fructose with low-fructose sweeteners”10.

DIABETES

Type-2 diabetes is a condition in which the body can no longer appropriately respond to, and in some cases produce, the hormone insulin. If not properly treated, diabetes can lead to serious health complications, including neuropathy, blindness and even death. More than 29 million people in the US have diabetes11, with trends showing that more and more people are being diagnosed each year.

“Another 86 million adults – more than one in three U.S. adults – have prediabetes, where their blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Without weight loss and moderate physical activity, 15 percent to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years”11. Diet, and sugar intake, in particular, is directly related to the development and progression of diabetes12. It is advised that those with diabetes carefully monitor their diet and eat sugar in moderation. “Sugar meets all the public health criteria for regulation”12.

heart disease

Heart disease places people at risk for heart attack or stroke. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women, and also a leading cause of death among men.13 Risk factors include being obese, smoking, and having a family history of heart disease. “Heart disease is largely preventable and healthy eating and physical activity go a long way to prevent heart disease, and keeping it from getting worse if you already have it”13. Some heart disease is genetic, but lifestyle plays a significant role, as well.13 Diet has an impact on the development of heart disease. One recent scientific paper suggested that sugar is more related to the development of heart disease than saturated fat14, so reducing intake of sugars is key, especially if you are at risk for developing heart disease. “Dietary guidelines should shift focus away from reducing saturated fat, and from replacing saturated fat with carbohydrates, specifically when these carbohydrates are refined".14

polycystic ovary syndrome

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is a condition in which the body produces many cysts on the ovaries. Also known as PCOS, this condition affects between 5-10% of women aged 15-44. The symptoms can vary, but can include cystic acne, excessive hair growth (facial hair), and irregular menstruation. Infertility is also a common symptom. Sugar seems to have a direct impact this condition. A diet low in carbohydrates and sugars can alleviate many of the symptoms of PCOS.15 “A diet low in carbohydrates (LCD) may be superior to a standard diet in terms of improving fertility, endocrine/metabolic parameters, weight loss and satiety in women with PCOS”.15


cancer

There has been a lot of new research investigating links between sugar and cancer. Studies show that sugar may promote the development and growth of cancer cells, in addition to healthy cells. But the biggest link between cancer and sugar actually is indirect, via the fact that sugar can promote obesity, and obesity is directly linking to increasing risk for developing cancer.16

Endometrial, liver, kidney, gastric, colorectal and pancreatic cancers are just a few of the many that have been shown to greater in individuals who have a high body mass index. “Many observational studies have provided consistent evidence that people who have lower weight gain during adulthood have lower risks of colon cancer, kidney cancer, and—for postmenopausal women—breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers”.16


Innatention
(cognitive functioning)

Brain health is something on the minds (literally) of many individuals. New studies suggest that what we eat can have a direct impact on our brain health, especially our cognitive functioning and attention. Several studies have shown that a diet high in refined carbohydrates can have a negative impact on neurocognitive functioning17. “Early life exposure to refined carbohydrates, (i.e., prenatal, juvenile, and adolescence periods) may be particularly toxic to cognitive functioning”17. Potential mechanisms of the carbohydrate-cognition relationship include dysregulation in metabolic, inflammatory, and vascular factors. Interestingly, the negative neurocognitive impacts of diets high in refined carbohydrates have been shown to be independent of total body weight, meaning that if you are overeating sugars and are normal weight, they can still impact your cognitive functioning. This is all the more reason to skip the added sugars!

death

fact: sugar can kill you

While it isn’t exactly an ailment, death is certainly something we want to avoid. But has sugar really been linked to it? You bet.

A recent clinical study showed that consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was positively related to increased mortality18. The researchers “documented 36,436 deaths (7,896 cardiovascular disease [CVD] and 12,380 cancer deaths)... After adjusting for major diet and lifestyle factors, consumption of SSBs was associated with a higher risk of total mortality."18

life without sugar can still be perfectly sweet

It might not be fast, and you likely won’t notice your slow death from a high-sugar diet, especially not as you eat your favorite sugar-laden foods…but the toll of sugar on your body is a truth bomb.

As explained, sugar intake plays a role in the development and exacerbation of many different health conditions, and yes, even death. Reducing added sugar intake should be a priority for everyone. It not only can improve how you feel and look, but it can also help you stay healthy and reduce your risk of developing many different health-related disorders.

At Lakanto, we value the sweet life: the long, healthy journey to your best self and giving you time to leave your mark on this world. In life, we all want sweetness, but that doesn’t have to be in the form of sugar. In fact, thousands of years ago, a healthy sweetener was found by the Luo Han monks in the mystic, pristine mountains of Asia. Enter monk fruit.

Lakanto’s mission is to bring chi to life and inspire people to reach their highest potential in health and wellness. We create products with monk fruit that are innovative, delicious, natural, nutritious, sugar-free, and healthy. See if our monk fruit sweeteners and convenience mixes make your choice to live a sugar-free life a bit more satisfying.

 

Find Your Chi
Live Sugar Free

Lakanto.com


References

  1. American Heart Association (2018). Added Sugars. Retrieved from https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/sugar/added-sugars.
  2. National Cancer Institute (2018). Usual Daily Intake of Added Sugars. Retrieved from   https://epi.grants.cancer.gov/diet/usualintakes/pop/2007-10/table_a40.html.
  3. New York State Department of Health (2018). Obesity Prevention. Retrieved from https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/obesity/.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Adult Obesity Facts. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html.
  5. Johnson RJ, Sánchez-Lozada LG, Andrews P, Lanaspa MA (2017). Perspective: A historical and scientific perspective of sugar and its relation with obesity and diabetes. Adv Nutr. 8(3):412-422. doi: 10.3945/an.116.014654. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28507007.
  6. Hu FB (2013). Resolved: there is sufficient scientific evidence that decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases. Obes Rev. 14(8):606-19. doi: 10.1111/obr.12040. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23763695.
  7. Narain A, Kwok CS, Mamas MA (2017). Soft drink intake and the risk of metabolic syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Clin Pract. 71(2). doi: 10.1111/ijcp.12927. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28074617.
  8. Pérez-Martínez P, Mikhailidis DP, Athyros VG, Bullo M, Couture P, Covas MI, et al. (2017). Lifestyle recommendations for the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome: an international panel recommendation. Nutr Rev.75(5):307-326. doi: 10.1093/nutrit/nux014. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28521334.
  9. He FJ, MacGregor GA (2015). Salt and sugar: their effects on blood pressure. Pflugers Arch. 467(3):577-86. doi: 10.1007/s00424-014-1677-x. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25547872.
  10. Ter Horst KW, Serlie MJ (2017). Fructose consumption, lipogenesis, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Nutrients. 9(9). pii: E981. doi: 10.3390/nu9090981. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28878197.
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). More than 29 million Americans has diabetes; 1 in 4 doesn’t know. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0610-diabetes-report.html.
  12. Lustig RH (2016). Sickeningly Sweet: Does sugar cause Type 2 Diabetes? Yes. Can J Diabetes. 40(4):282-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2016.01.004. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27216628.
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